4 Veteran Interview Questions to Prep For

September 15, 2018 / projectwecare

Veterans interview questions

You are a veteran. You are among an elite group totaling over 20 million who put their lives on the line to protect our country. For that, our team and other organizations are in your debt.

If you’re in the midst of transitioning from military life into a private sector job or have been out of work for a while and are trying to break into a role you know you’d be great for, the number one thing you can do right now is schedule as many interviews as possible and thoroughly prepare for each one.

To that end, our team would like to lend some guidance. While interviews can be scary, especially if you’ve been out of the workforce for some time, if you adequately prepare, things will go smoothly!

Below are 4 common interview questions military vets have reported being asked and how you can approach your answers.

1. “Tell me About Yourself.”

This question seems straightforward but can trip a lot of people up. How long or short should your answer be? What does the interviewer really want to know?

As a rule of thumb, when an interviewer wants to know more about you, you can offer them a top-line overview of what brought you to apply for this position. Use this question to highlight your proudest achievements and greatest qualities. Remember that this is your only chance to prove yourself outside of your resume.

Talk about what schools you went to, how that led to or ran parallel to your military life, and what interests and passions drove you to come to this interview today.

2. “Tell Me a Little Bit about Your Work History.”

Hiring managers want to know why you left previous jobs and what you learned from them up to this point. This question is a great opportunity for you, as a military veteran, to describe how your military roles gave you the perspective you need to perform at the role you’re applying to. If you were a member of the military, this is a top-line example of how you are a hard worker and never give up.

Qualities like leadership skills, an ability to take direction, and anything else you think would be relevant to share should be leaned on in your answer.

3. “Why This Company and Why Now?”

Interviewers want to make sure their company isn’t just one out of a hundred on your list. They want to make sure you’re genuinely interested in the role they’re offering.

For that reason, when you hear this question, be sure to have done some research on both the company and the role you’re applying for and let your interviewer know more about how your sensibilities align with the company’s culture.

4. “Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?”

This is a question asked to military veterans and the general population alike to see if you’re planning on being around for the long haul given the cost of turnover.

As a military veteran, you know a thing or two about loyalty. So, when this question comes up, it would benefit you to talk about how important loyalty was during your service time and how you’re looking to take that same loyalty and stick with this company over the next 5 years and beyond!

Wrapping Up Veteran Interview Questions

The most common veteran interview questions align pretty well with the most common interview questions asked of the general population.

The key difference is the unique perspective you can bring to your answers. Always reference your military experience and the qualities that experience instilled in you. Talk about how those qualities would bolster the role you’re applying to.

If you do that, keep things light, and let your personality shine through, hiring managers will be chomping at the bits to bring you into their ranks!

For more job finding information and other tools for military veterans, delve deeper into the resources we offer at ProjectWeCare.org. You can also learn more about getting involved with our organization here.

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